Recipe: Vegan Homemade Pasta Dough

lasagna_2Hello everyone,

Over the holidays, my partner and I did a lot of binge watching. You can relate, right? One of our new favorite videos is Pasta Grannies on YouTube.

The premise is simple. A British woman goes around recording Italian grannies making pasta. So simple, yet so entirely addictive to watch!

I don’t have any memories of my grandparents making pasta from scratch from my childhood, but my mom does. She told me all about how her childhood Sundays were a full day of rolling out gnocchi and simmering sauce. I suppose watching Pasta Grannies is comforting and helps me feel more connected to my Italian side. Plus, I was happily surprised that many of the pasta recipes they used were vegan.

The recipes called for the simplest of ingredients, like water, salt, and some type of flour – the most common being semolina which is made from durum wheat. This makes it ideal for pasta as it will produce a sturdier pasta than general all-purpose flour.

Aside from the videos, the pasta stars aligned, as for the holidays I had also finally caved in and asked for the Kitchen Aid Mixer set of three pasta attachmentsCarb-filled evenings, here I come!

I scoured the internet, reviewed a plethora of Pasta Grannies videos, and I came up with a simple, yet tasty vegan pasta recipe. Was it completely perfect out of the gate? No. But it makes a mean pasta with minimal effort. Besides requiring just a handful of basic ingredients, it takes just under 30 minutes to prepare.

What are you waiting for? Give it a shot!

Cheers & happy cooking!

Jocelyn


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Homemade Vegan Pasta Dough

***Please feel free to share widely, just give me some credit or a link back. 

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Cook Time: ~3 minutes

Yield: 4 servings

Ingredients

  • 2½ cups, semolina flour
  • ½-1 cup, water
  • 1 tbs, extra virgin olive oil
  • ½ tsp, salt
  • 1 tbs, freshly minced oregano
  • 1 tbs, freshly minced basil
  • Extra unbleached all-purpose flour to prevent sticking

Directions

  • Place the flour, salt, herbs, and olive oil in your Kitchen Aid Mixer, food processor or simply use a bowl. Then combine the ingredients at a low speed.
    • Add water 1 tbsp at a time while the mixer is running or you are stirring with a fork.
    • Keep adding water until you achieve a dough-like consistency.
      • Note, you will need to work the dough for quite a few minutes. It should be smooth in texture and a  bit sticky.
  • Dust a clean surface with the all-purpose flour.
    • Remove the dough from the mixer and set it on the floured surface.
    • Cover the dough with a kitchen towel to rest for 10 minutes.
  • Dust a rolling pin with flour and roll out the dough to a quarter inch.
    • If using a KitchenAid pasta attachment, begin to put sections of the rolled dough through
      the initial ‘flattening pasta attachment.’
    • Then attach the spaghetti attachment, and collect small batches of spaghetti.
    • If you do not have a KitchenAid pasta attachment, you can still make pasta! 
      • Roll the dough very thin (1/8 -1/10″) and cut small strips to make fettuccine.
      • You could also make lasagna noodles by ensuring the dough is rolled into a long, rectangular shape before cutting the pasta.
  • Place your pasta batches on a lightly floured surface and dust with more flour.
    • You may want to hang the pasta on a nonstick drying rack to ensure the dough does not stick together.
  • Next, bring a large pot of salted water to a boil.
    • Add a small about of olive oil to prevent the noodles from sticking.
    • Add the fresh pasta, and cook for ~3 minutes if making spaghetti.
      • Note, the cooking time may go up to 6 minutes if you make a larger type of pasta. Additionally, my family really likes al dente pasta!
  • Finally, strain the water and cover with your favorite marinara sauce and fresh herbs.
  • Enjoy immediately! (Please note, fresh pasta does not make for good leftovers!)

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